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MessageSujet: Interviews sur les comics   Interviews sur les comics Icon_minitimeDim 2 Aoû - 15:29

Vous trouverez ici toutes les interviews sur les comics de la série.
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MessageSujet: Re: Interviews sur les comics   Interviews sur les comics Icon_minitimeDim 2 Aoû - 15:30

Une interview de Juliet Landau, sur "Angel : Aftermath". Interview par : Fearnet.com

Citation :
With a music video, a documentary, a video game, an animated TV show, and a feature film all in the pipeline, Juliet Landau is easily the hardest working former vampire in Hollywood. But it’s her return to Angel, this time as writer of IDW’s monthly comic book, that has horror fans most excited. We caught a few moments with the wildly busy Buffy alum at Comic-Con yesterday to get the skinny.

On how she came to write Angel…

Chris Ryall, editor of IDW, and Brian Lynch approached me and said, "Are you interested in doing a two-issue arc," and I said, "Absolutely." That was the inception of it. Literally, I hang up the phone and I’m in the editing bay – because I co-directed a music video with the band Godhead called "Hero" – so I was editing that and immediately I got the idea for the story and talked to them about it and they loved it and I got it into script form and Brian Lynch and I went to work. It was a really interesting process because I wrote it in Final Draft, sent it to them and they absolutely loved it, Brian Lynch sent me a synopsis for issue one, I reworked it, sent it back. We did the same thing for issue two. He wrote the first five pages, I got them, reworked them, sent them back. We did the same thing for the first thirteen pages and then I got to the full 22. Then I rewrote the synopsis for issue two because I had a real moment of clarity about how I wanted to open it up. So Brian wrote the first five pages of that one, sent it to me, I reworked them and then said, "You know what ? I’m just going to continue. And I just went ahead and wrote on to page 22, sent it to him, and he said, "I think we’re good. I think that this is fantastic." So it was a really fun process.

On whether or not she’ll write more comic stories…

I’ve been approached on some other things. I really enjoyed it, it was very creative, and I was also involved in the visuals and the art. I brought a couple artists in as well as working with [them] on the inhouse art. I would definitely be interested, I had a great time.

On whether she’ll provide the creepy girl voices in Bioshock 2…

I did some other characters on Bioshock 2. I didn’t do the Little Sisters in Bioshock 2 [like I did in Bioshock 1], I did a character named Eva Tate who’s a French movie star. It’s actually a really interesting character and voice. And I also did another character, a female revolutionary, very tough and angry and passionate character as well.

On her role in the Green Lantern animated film…

I play a character named Labella [in the upcoming Green Lantern]. It’s beautifully drawn and it’s a really different character, and a very different sound than I’ve ever done before. She wasn’t in the original Green Lantern ; they created her for the film. She’s a character that Hal and Sinestro come to investigate. She’s an alien with a little bit of an Amy Winehouse kind of thing going on. When they sent me the script I loved the character and the drawing, and the voice just came to me.

On her other upcoming feature film…

I’m shooting an adorable kids’ movie. It’s called Monster Mutt, created by Drac Studios. I’m playing the slinky, blonde, Russian baddie. I’ve been slinking around in cat suits and being evil.

On her directorial work and music recordings…

I directed a short documentary film about Gary Oldman that’s called Take Flight. We’re in talks and figuring out about getting it out there. After the "Hero" music video, I’m recording like four songs with Jason Miller, the lead singer [of Godhead]. We had an appearance in Florida where we showed the video and the behind-the- scenes, and then he had a concert and I sang two songs with him and it was really fun. So we’re gonna co-write and do four songs and sell it on iTunes. This other artist, Jude Rawlins, of the Subterraneans, he wrote an incredible song that was based on Drusilla – Spike and Dru – so he wrote this new song and said, "I don’t know if you’ll be interested in this…" And I loved it, so we’re going to record that together too.


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MessageSujet: Re: Interviews sur les comics   Interviews sur les comics Icon_minitimeJeu 20 Aoû - 15:59

A nouveau une intervciew de Juliet, au sujet des comics "Angel Aftermath" (Thewriteenvironment.blogspot.com Interview).


Citation :
After The Fall Juliet Landau Takes On Angel

One of the downsides to working as a writer in the entertainment industry is that writers are often pigeonholed into one style of writing ; as if someone who writes science fiction films can’t handle a strong dramatic period piece. It’s frustrating because a good writer doesn’t want to keep writing the same story over and over again just as a good actor doesn’t want to continue playing the same role from one film to the next. It’s a vicious cycle in Hollywood ; the machine wants to suckle the success formula until its bone dry.

For many years all I wrote were high concept comedies because that was the genre of the first script I sold. It was expected and incumbent on me to continue doing what I did best, without any thought of doing what I wanted to do most. That is until I wrote my first suspense thriller, which my agent at the time assured me would sell for seven figures. When it didn’t the agency dropped me. I was hardly discouraged. In fact I followed that script with a youthful action period piece which was immediately snapped up by a network as a series and ended up affording me the opportunity to sign with an even better agency. This eventually got me a gig writing a serious bio-pic for one of the most lauded authors of our time. Not bad for a comedy writer. Of course I still write comedies. I’ve even written a pilot for a romantic sitcom on spec recently, but not because someone was demanding it from me, but because it’s what I was driven to write. The point is a good writer will always rise to the top no matter what the genre. And while some writers do like to stick with a formula they know best, others like to stretch their talent and take chances.

The same can be said for actors, too. It’s just as difficult for Adam Sandler to be taken seriously, as it is for Meryl Streep to be seen as funny. But that hasn’t stopped them from making the effort. This brings me to this week’s interview with Juliet Landau. Lately, she’s been making that effort… and then some.

Yeah, we all know she’s famous for her role as Drusilla, the psychotic vampire on BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER and ANGEL, but she’s not just a one trick pony. In addition to being an accomplished TV & Feature Film actress, she’s also proven her worth as a voice actor and lent her talents to projects such as Ben Ten : Alien Force, Justice League and most recently Green Lantern First Flight. But that ain’t all, because Landau recently made a name for herself as the director of TAKE FLIGHT, her documentary about Gary Oldman’s music video for the band Chutzpah and for co-directing the Godhead music video HERO, which Landau also appears in.

So let’s see… she acts, she directs and now move over literary luminaries because she also writes. That’s right, Landau has become a triple threat by branching off into the comic book milieu with a two-part installment of the ANGEL series centering on Drusilla, co-written with IDW scribe Brian Lynch. So with all that in mind, I was curious how someone with her background and talent made the transition to writer so smoothly.

Jeffrey Berman : Angel #24 is the first comic you’ve ever written, so how did you approach writing the book ?

Juliet Landau : I was really excited when Chris Ryall and Brian Lynch approached me to do it. I had read all of the Angel and Buffy comics. As I hung up from our initial phone call, the idea came to me. I wrote it in script form (Final Draft) and they loved it so we progressed from there. Next, I asked Chris to send me a few of the previous issues’ final scripts. I compared and studied them against the printed comics, so that I could learn the formatting, structure, number of panels per page etc…

I wanted to play with certain themes. A significant one being, order versus chaos. The doctors/the Institution think they have all of the answers, but Dru’s very existence defies that. She’s a character that cannot be reined in. I also wanted to play with the visuals, to further the story. The Institution and the people in it are cold, sterile, stark. Drusilla is the most vibrant element in each frame. Even though she is undead, she is more alive than the world surrounding her.

JB : The two issue arc centers around Drusilla. A character, it’s safe to say you’re pretty familiar with. So what did you bring to the script from an actress’ perspective ?

JL : It was fantastic to revisit Drusilla. I think I brought a core emotional understanding of the character, especially in Issue 2, as Issue 1 is primarily the set-up. Dru’s history is dark and complex. I don’t think that she is often aware of what is motivating her, but I as the actress in the show, had to be. The audience made the connection, and in this case, the reader does. We all act out, based on our past (to lesser degrees, I hope !). I think it was because of having played her, that I was interested in exploring that reservoir.

JB : Before you began writing the comic book did you do any research or speak to any other writers in the industry and if so what advice did they give you ?

JL : I sort of jumped in. I was working with Brian Lynch, who had written all of the previous Angel : After The Fall books. He is an incredible talent.

JB : What did you find was the most difficult part of writing the story and how did you work through it ?

JL : There was a particular thing at the end that kept niggling me. I did what I do in any creative venture… I think about it relentlessly until I get the answer. I work it and re-work it mentally until I know the way I want to go. I have been branching into all kinds of creative areas. I directed Take Flight, a short documentary film about Gary Oldman (julietlandaustakeflight.com) and co-directed Godhead’s Hero music video (http://godheadhero.com/). Whether acting, directing or writing, I find my creative process to be very similar.

JB : What did you learn about being a writer from this experience and do you plan on writing anything else in the near future ?

JL : I loved it ! Working in this medium really forces you to think visually. It is about communicating a lot economically, with visuals, not with words. I really like that anyway, in movies/theater because behavior communicates volumes. I have written a short film called “It’s Raining Cats and Cats,” in which I will play seven different characters and I adapted a piece that I worked on at the Actors Studio into a short as well. I wrote those prior to the Dru comics and I definitely look forward to writing more !

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MessageSujet: Re: Interviews sur les comics   Interviews sur les comics Icon_minitimeJeu 15 Oct - 16:30

Vosu trouverez à cette adresse une interview de Brian Lynch au sujet des comics ATS :

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MessageSujet: Re: Interviews sur les comics   Interviews sur les comics Icon_minitimeVen 16 Oct - 15:35

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MessageSujet: Re: Interviews sur les comics   Interviews sur les comics Icon_minitimeDim 1 Nov - 17:11

Interview de Brian Lynch sur "Angel : Last Angel In Hell" (Comicbookresources.com Interview)


Citation :
Whenever discussion amongst Joss Whedon fans turns, as it inevitably will, to the possibility of a "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" film, at least one person in the group will point out that Whedon’s beloved television show was preceded by a more or less unrelated movie starring Kristy Swanson and Luke Perry. Thus "Angel," which spun out of the "Buffy" TV series, might be said to be a show based on a show based on a movie - which is now published as a comic book series by IDW Publishing. But in December, "Angel : After the Fall" writer Brian Lynch and artist Stephen Mooney will re-imagine Angel’s adventures for the silver screen in "Last Angel in Hell," a comic also known as "Angel Annual" #1. CBR News caught up with Lynch to discuss the first Angel annual and the thought that went into his Hollywood parody.

Lynch has been associated with IDW’s "Angel" comics from the start, with his Whedon co-plotted "Angel : After the Fall" picking up where season five of the television show left off, and also has enough Hollywood cred to re-imagine Angel’s story for a fake film. "I’m a screenwriter (I wrote ’The Sims’ movie for Fox and ’Puss in Boots’ for Dreamworks), so it was not at all hard to imagine how a studio executive would want to change Angel’s story," Lynch said. "Angel can’t just be a loner, he has to talk about being a loner to all the people he hangs out with all the time. Plus, above all else, Angel needs a love interest. As Angel didn’t have one in ’Angel : After the Fall,’ Hollywood has turned Spike into a lady and made them a couple. They weren’t that far off from couple-status on the TV show anyway. A couple that’s been together far too long, and likes to bicker, but a couple."

Lady Spike is still called Spike, Lynch said, "but it’s because of what Angel calls ’the tiny little spikes in her teeth’ once she’s a vamp." He also said her British accent comes and goes. "In my head I pictured the actress not able to pull off a British accent that well.

Other characters needed some more-than-cosmetic changes for the screen as well, Lynch said. "I figured Betta George, the telepathic fish from ’Angel : After the Fall,’ would be considered too weird for Hollywood’s tastes, so George has been turned into a dog," Lynch told CBR. "And there’s no way Hollywood would make the one black guy in the story a villain, so Gunn is (a) white and (b) not the bad guy. I don’t want to spoil who the villain is, but he’s red and has horns and a tail and a pitchfork. And if you called him ’Satan’ he’d go ’what ?’ Sorry to be so cryptic in my hints.

"Finally, a big movie like ’Last Angel in Hell’ would have lots of toys, so the characters are forced to wear different outfits for variant action figure costumes, and carry around all sorts of big chunky weapons for action figure accessories. Gunn’s hideout, for instance, is based on an awesome playset from a popular toyline years ago."

Speaking of toys, "Angel Annual : The Last Angel in Hell" will reveal the level of merchandising possible with an "Angel" film. "Advertisements for the toys, cereal, fast food happy meals, they’re all in the comic, too," Lynch said. "I wish they were real. Maybe if people buy enough copies, we can get a Nic Cage as Angel figure with Karate Kick Action."

"Last Angel in Hell" begins a few weeks before the fall of Los Angeles and ends a few weeks after the city has been saved, Lynch revealed, albeit with "Far more explosions" than what had been seen in "Angel : After the Fall." "Hollywood would demand it," the writer explained.

"Angel is no longer a vampire with a soul, he’s hard-ass cop Angel Cartwright," Lynch said of the hypothetical film version of Angel. "Angel just lost his partner Wesley and is afraid of connecting with other people. Through the course of the movie he learns to trust again. And blows stuff up. And has sex. And has sex while stuff blows up."

With the current Hollywood and television vogue for vampires, spurred on by the "Twilight" series and HBO’s "True Blood," it may be surprising that Angel is not a vampire in Lynch’s adaptation. Lynch said, though, that if it will help sell comics, he’s willing to concede that Angel might retain one of a vampire’s most characteristic attributes. "HEY TWILIGHT FANS, ANGEL’S SKIN KINDA GLOWS, BUY THIS COMIC !" he joked. "Maybe we could have a glow-in-the-dark variant edition."

As to who might play Angel and company on the silver screen, Lynch has a few ideas. "Angel and Gunn are the only two that are actually based on actors. Angel is, how do I put this... inspired by Nic Cage. He has been in/almost been in enough super hero movies, so I figured he’d jump at the chance to play Angel," Lynch said. "Plus, the whole movie is very Jerry Bruckheimeresque, and Cage and Bruckheimer work together an awful lot. It really couldn’t have been anyone else. I just wish we could have worked in a side story wherein Angel had to steal 50 cars in one night.

"Gunn is inspired by Jorge Garcia, Hurley from ’Lost.’ Gunn is more of the sidekick, smart-ass of the movie, and Jorge has that down to a science. And Gunn is also a bit of a gun-nut. Again, I figured Hollywood would hear the name and would lack the imagination to go in any other direction."

Lynch’s female version of Spike, though, is not based on any real actress, which the writer said is for practical reasons. "I didn’t want her to be famous, because there’s a very good chance Spike will meet up with the actress in his solo series, starting next year," the writer said. "Spike would want to meet the lady that played him, for sure. So if I made it, say, Angelina Jolie, I couldn’t use her as a supporting character in ’Spike.’ Angelina would probably get uppity, even though Maddox Pitt Jolie would dig the fact that his mom in a comic.

"Illyria also isn’t based on anyone famous. She’s a tough black lady, but I didn’t give Stephen any suggestions. And the source of her power isn’t the same as it is with the actual Illyria. Movie Illyria’s origin is pretty great. Maybe we can do a prequel comic."

Artist Stephen Mooney is providing two covers for the Angel annual, one featuring the real Angel & company, and one with their on-screen counterparts, with both looking like movie posters. Lynch said the version with the authentic Angel crew would be more likely to make him shell out at the box office, because he’d love to see a real Angel movie. "There are so many vampire movies right now, can’t we sneak an Angel one out ? I’ll fund it myself," he joked. "How much do movies cost, like 300, 400 bucks ? I have to ask my parents, but I can get that dough, if need be."

While not giving away the ending to "Last Angel in Hell," Lynch did reveal that the finale "absolutely sets up a sequel." "No idea if we’ll ever get to do it, future ’Last Angel’ adventures depend on the sales of this one, of course," he said. "But the set-up is there, and you can kinda see the plotline we’d be following from the set-up on the last couple pages of the adaptation. The title would be ’The Next Last Angel in Hell.’"


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MessageSujet: Re: Interviews sur les comics   Interviews sur les comics Icon_minitimeMar 3 Nov - 18:00

Interview de Georges Jeanty sur la saison 8 en comics (Examiner.com Interview) :

Citation :
Summer 2011 would be great for the start of Buffy Season 9 but Joss shouldn’t rush it.If Joss wants a little longer break after the end of season 8,then by all means let him have it.

It does sound like the end of season 8 is going to set up season 9 very well.It seems to me that Joss is basically telling a two season arc now.We already knew it was probably going to be shorter then season 8 but I think this is the first time we’ve heard it is more finite.

It makes me think that the end of season 8 will be more like the end of seasons 2(Becoming),4(Restless) and 6(Grave) while the end of season 9 will be more like the ends of seasons 1(Prophecy Girl),3(Graduation Day),5(The Gift),and 7(Chosen).

The finales of seasons 2,4,and 6 had a more open book setup feel to the end of those where seasons 1,3,5,and 7 had more of a closed chapter feel.These season finales work perfectly as series finales where seasons 2,4 and 6 ended IMO with a little more clifhanger feel to them.Becoming with Buffy running away,Restless with setting up the mystery of season 5 and Grave ending with Spike recieving a soul.

As for other Buffyverse writers who Joss wants to bring into season 9 that were too busy for season 8 ?I seem to recall that Marti Noxon expressed interest in writing for Buffy Season 8 but couldn’t due to her schedule.Wouldn’t surprise me if she tries for season 9.

Georges mentioned a few times in other interviews that he’s good friends with Juliet Landau and she follows season 8. This weekend was the HalloWhedon convention.Nicholas Brendon was there.I wonder if anyone told him the recent developments in season 8 with there now being a Buffy/Xander/Dawn triangle going on in the comic.I still get a kick at the casts reaction from Paleyfest to the Buffy/Satsu fling.So I’m pretty interested if the Buffy/Xander/Dawn triangle was brought up at HalloWhedon and what the actors like Nick or James Marsters reaction to it was ?


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MessageSujet: Re: Interviews sur les comics   Interviews sur les comics Icon_minitimeMar 3 Nov - 18:18

Séance de Q/A avec Brian Lynch, au sujet des issues 26 et 27. A noter que ça contient des spoilers sur la saison 8 de BTVS (avec une question sur Spike et Angel Interviews sur les comics 237987 ) :

Citation :
1. neowhobaz: I'd love to know what your inspiration for the boys and their toys issues was .

Brian Lynch: Literally walking around the convention and thinking how cool/scary it would be if everyone suddenly became what they were wearing. I was thinking of turning into a movie, but then thought "might be too close to the BUFFY episode". And then I thought "wait a minute..." and the rest is history (history = ANGEL 26-27).

2. Hellbound Hyperion: Can you talk about some of the ideas you have bouncing around for the SPIKE series yet? Or is that very hush-hush at the moment?

Brian Lynch: Sure. Spike starts in Los Angeles, but spends a stretch of time in Las Vegas (if you thought Los Angeles in the Whedonverse was evil...).

Angel will definitely be appearing, Beck will have an arc, Jeremy will pop up.

The general consensus is people like when Spike and Lorne are together, so if I can find a way to do it without making it seem odd or morbid after Andy Hallett's unfortunate passing, I will.

It will have funny moments, and won't be morbid, but it's dealing with some dark themes.

There will be a musical issue. Kidding, kidding. Or am I?

I would love a 3-D issue (I even know the storyline) but I'm not sure of the pricing/possibility.

3. jellymoff: Is Last Angel In Hell just a straight up adaptation of the "movie" or will the actual characters make an appearance as well? I'd really like to see what Gunn has to say about his, um "changes".

Brian Lynch: It's an exact adaptation. Save for one of the covers, this is exactly the comic adaptation Angel could pick up in his world. Everything about the comic is fake. The movie it's adapting, the story, the fake ads...

4. hitnrun-17: You say Angel will make an appearence(s) in the Spike series, as well as other characters. Will there be a chronological continuity between the Angel and Spike series? Or will the Spike series just be his own world?

Brian Lynch: I hope so, I really do. I will not intentionally negate anything Bill does, this much I promise.

5. iloveromy: With Spike now open to a world of possibiilties, what are some of the broad strokes for how you would like to see the character grow. He is probably one of the most changed characters throughout the entire Buffyverse. I am very interested to see where you take him. Also if I may, will his past come in to play a bit? Sunnydale, Pre-Sunnydale? Thanks!

Brian Lynch: I don't want to get into Spike's growth as a character, it's too spoilery, but yes, his past most definitely comes into play. It's a huge part of who he is.

6. Wyndam: Have you pinned down a name for Spike's series yet? Is "No Bad To Big" the name of an arc?

Also, if I can ask another. Since Willingham has said Spike will be appearing in #28+, will that move back Spike's launch date, so Spike isn't in two series at once?

Brian Lynch: It will have different names for the arcs, but so far it's just SPIKE. Sometimes I call it SPIKE UNLIMITED, which has a nice ring to it.

Things I saw in the preview pages have made me alter a few things in my planning, that's for sure. But I think Spike can be in two comics at once, there's time for Spike to participate in two adventures every month.

7. Wyndam: All the stuff about Spike's series sounds great. Are there any plans for Groo to show up? You write him so well.

Brian Lynch: He probably will, but nothing concrete for him yet. I love the hell out of writing him. Someone pointed out that I don't write him exactly how he was written on the show, but I kind of like the turn he's taken, so I'm torn.

8. bamph: Do you ever foresee down the line of doing a occasional large scale crossover event storyline with Bill Willingham on the Angel monthly? Where the stories from Spike and Angel crossover into each others books and the plotline runs between the two monthlies? Would you be open to that if Willingham is at some point?

I know at DC and Marvel this is done too often, but done well and not too much ,they can be great for a larger scope storyline.

Brian Lynch: You know, I would kill to work on ANYTHING with Bill, I've been a fan for years. I still can't believe that George actually gets dialog written by someone as awesome as Bill.

That said, I have the first arc of SPIKE stories planned out. Roughly ten issues, and there's no crossover event in the mix.

9. kaleidoscope: Is there any possibility of Tok visiting Spike ?

Brian Lynch: I think Tok is my favorite character I've created for the ANGEL/SPIKE books (runners up include Beck, Jeremy, Non and George), but there's really no place for her yet. If I can find a way to bring her in, absolutely. But I don't want to throw her in just to throw her in, you know?

Of course, this could all change tomorrow and she'll be in issue 1 or something. So don't hold me to it.

10. AndrewCrossett: His [Groo's] scene confronting the demon furries was hilarious. I think he's funnier now than he was in the TV show. Your writing of him is pretty consistent with what we could expect him to be like now, since he's had more time to observe our world and absorb some pop culture.

Anyway, my question... without mentioning any specifics, did Joss ever give you any hints as to his long-term plans for Angel and Spike? If so, do you take that into consideration while writing them, or are you pretty much flying free?

Brian Lynch: You know what helped me write Groo? Reading Mark Lutz interviews and talking to him a little in email. He is wonderfully funny and charming. I wish he was made a regular on ANGEL, I think he would have been awesome. If I ever have control over casting on ANYTHING I write movie/tv-wise, I'm going right to Mark. And Nick Brendan.

But thank you for your kind words about my take on Groo. He's so much fun to write.

Onto your question: when Joss and I sat down, he absolutely told me scenes/stories they planned, including the SPIKE movie. The SPIKE movie and AFTER THE FALL (or, as it would have been called on TV, season 6 of ANGEL) could not have happened together as they both went down different paths. But he said specific moments/scenes that I used in ATF and I have in the back of my head and will sprinkle into SPIKE UNLIMITED, which I'm calling it today. Tomorrow I will probably call it something different.

11. angeliclestat: Congrats on a great issue Brian - you're gonna be missed on Angel!

Just a kind of follow up question to the whole continuity issue.I was kinda surprised to see Spike appearing in preview pages Ryall posted for Angel #28 - I was worried that we were going to have a repeat of the whole 'Illyria and Gunn going off in a car" thing in #18 because Armstrong hadn't seen the final pages for #17 and didnt know Gunn was in a coma. Luckily you managed to rescue that with #23 which lead into 'Only Human', but this is slightly bigger.

So with things like Angel appearing in Spike, will you be informed as to what is happening in 'Angel', and will Willingham be made aware of what you are doing on 'Spike' so that there will be no major contradictions.

And were you aware that Willingham was using Spike in his Angel story?

Brian Lynch: Bill told me he was using Spike at Comic Con. I was a bit surprised to see Spike and Illyria in the same room in the ANGEL 28 preview, so it altered plans for SPIKE FOREVER, which I'm calling it for this post.

12. Hellbound Hyperion: I'd like to follow up on that with a more generalized question - have you and Joss talked much about the ANGEL comics post-Aftermath, or is it all you just doing whatcha wanna?

Brian Lynch: I answered this a few posts back, but it's an important question so I will say again. SPIKE will be a storyline from my adorable head sprinkled with ideas/themes that were to be covered in the SPIKE movie. In a way, it's not unlike SPIKE:AFTER THE FALL in that sense. So if you like that, you'll like SPIKE EVERLASTING. Although SPIKE EVERLASTING (which is the name I'm going with at this moment) will much more epic in scope.

13. iloveromy: I don't have my issues in front of me so I can't remember the exact resolution but I think it's still kind of in play. Do you think the Shanshu Prophecy is still important to Angel and or Spike's storylines? Or at this point has it become an obvious "carrot on a stick" and these characters should move away from that resolution?

Brian Lynch: It's important to Angel because of what it means he'll become. Spike isn't dwelling on it.

14. bamph: Spoilers for Season 8: In Buffy Season 8,they are playing with a love triangle between Buffy/Xander/Dawn.This is now starting to really play out in Jane Espenson's current arc and will probably continue into Joss's upcoming issue in January and Brad Meltzer's arc after that most likely.Basically over the course of season 8,Buffy has developed 'feelings' for Xander and was going to act on them right when he and Dawn have gotten together.Buffy walked in on them.Xander/Dawn has been developing over the course of the season too.Xander at this point is unaware of Buffy's feelings nor is Dawn and Buffy is hurt and angry about catching the two together as seen in this week's issue.

So from a pure fanish perspective,how do you think Spike would react to Buffy developing romantic feelings for Xander and Xander/Dawn being together?If you were actally writing it,how do you think Spike would react to the whole Buffy/Xander/Dawn triangle?For that matter how do you think Angel would react?

Keeping in mind Spike's and Angel's previous history with Xander and Spike's previous relationship with Dawn.Plus assuming,they still don't know that Buffy was never dating The Immortal and that was a decoy.


Brian Lynch: Wait, who's together? Wow. Okay. Off the top of my head---

1. Spike hears about Xander and Dawn first. Spike pauses, thinks about it, tells Xander if he hurts her, Spike hurts him. And then subtly pats him on the back.

2. Then, Spike hears about Buffy's feelings. It wounds him, he doesn't show it, he makes fun of Xander for two pages very loudly. He then goes away, beats someone up, comes back, and wants to help her with whatever she's going through.

3. He takes Xander aside and says "are you SURE you're not using any spells? Potions? Deals with the devil?" Xander maintains he's not, Spike looks at him, silently for a beat and then says "teach me your ways."

Angel would just want Buffy to be happy and safe. His reaction to Xander/Dawn wouldn't be that big, obviously. His reaction to Buffy's feelings for Xander? I solemn "I knew it."


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MessageSujet: Re: Interviews sur les comics   Interviews sur les comics Icon_minitimeMar 3 Nov - 18:21

Suite :

Citation :
15. Wyndam: This is kinda just for housekeeping purposes, but is there any kind of overall arc name or anything that you describe #23-28 with?

Brian Lynch: I don't, no. I'm sorry.

16. sagewoman: First with the adoration - I love how you do Groo. Actually, I love how you write everyone. I just read Boys and their Toys - FANTASTIC!!!! And, Stephen Mooney's art - I love that man!

Okay, now I have to ask a question...hmmm...I love being surprised...you are a genius at writing...I trust where you are taking us.....okay, I've got one.

What kind of instructions do you give Stephen about the scene for the art? Your story and his art are beautiful.

Brian Lynch: Thank you so much for your kind words.

As for Stephen, same with Franco. I give them panel-by-panel breakdown, but rarely point of view camera angles or anything, I've worked with them enough that we have a wonderful shorthand. I trust them both 100%.

If you want to see any page of script from ANGEL 26, let me know which one and I'll put it up. That'll help you get an idea of how we do it.

17. AndrewCrossett: Is there a good chance that Drusilla will be popping up in SPIKE ETERNAL at some point? And if so, would you collaborate with Juliet again on writing her?

Would you like to use Harmony, and are you allowed to since she's in BtVS season 8?

Brian Lynch: Keeping in mind I only have a very rough outline, I can say that for now, Dru is not in the first 10 issues of SPIKE. If I continue beyond that, she may.

I would like to use Harmony. I think I'm allowed to, but she's not in the first 10 either.

18. Malsad: Besides Juliet, what other Whedon-verce actor would you love to co-write a comic with?

Brian Lynch: Well, I have my future in the Whedonverse mapped out, so I guess I'm not going to co-write with any of them because I'm just doing the SPIKE series. That said, if James himself wanted to do something, I could hardly pass that up.

19. Hellbound Hyperion: With SPIKE INFINITY, are you going to do something like what was done in ANGEL with flashbacks through some of Spike's life? I know we've seen a good portion of his vampire life through both BUFFY and ANGEL, but there's always potential for more story there, as well as his human life, which we know little about.

You may have already sorta touched on this, but I wanted know as an ANGEL fan if you thought the same sort of flashback-type episodes from ANGEL would work well for Spike.

Brian Lynch: There will be some flashbacks, I do believe. Yes.
I think flashback episodes of SPIKE would be great, sure. They could definitely work.

20. Paul: How come the Drusilla issues never had a subtitle? It's weird, considering IDW's obsession with them (Angel: After the Fall: Epilogue: Become What You Are?)

Brian Lynch: IDW doesn't have an obsession with them. They want to have a subtitle on their books so people can tell them apart, but for the most part, it's up to the writer. Blame the EPILOGUE title on me.

Oh, forgot to answer your question, sorry. I think everyone thought ANGEL:DRUSILLA: SOMETHING SOMETHING would be too much. I know everyone involved just calls them DRUSILLA.

21. Thorn N' Roses: Hey, did you have to get permission by Nicholas Cage and Jorge Garcia to use their likeness?

Brian Lynch: We had Stephen draw them JUST LEFT of the actual actors so we're okay. It's kind of parody anyhoo. Cage and Garcia are both comic fans, so I'd imagine they'd dig it.

22. iloveromy: You should try to get Lady Gaga as a side kick. Her ability to wear anything might be helpful to team Spike. Oops not a question, just sayin'.

Brian Lynch: I agree. She'll be on team SPIKE in the new book SPIKE GAGA, as I'm calling it starting now.

23. Moon Eyes: What about any of Spike's past loves coming to make an appearance?

Brian Lynch: That's spoilery, but the first issue starts with the death of BUFFY.

I'm kidding, come on. It starts with the death of disco. It's a period piece.

24. Paul: What made you pick Nicholas Cage of all people to play Fictional Angel?

Brian Lynch: He's been attached to play so many superheroes, and he's been in so many Bruckheimer movies, kinda HAD to be him.

25. bamph: Is SPIKE:BRAND NEW DAY going to occasionally reflect or give small nods to the status quo of the current larger Buffyverse with vampires being loved by the public at large and slayers hated/hunted?Sort of like how you had slayers appear in After The Fall?

Brian Lynch: Yes, I will do my best.

26. buffycomic: Regarding the Drusilla story arc, given the fact that stories like Gunn appear in separate mini-series like "Angel: Only Human", why was a story that didn't focus on Angel whatsoever take place in his main book and not in a separate one-shot or mini-series.

I'm still also confused by the ending, I interpretted it that the Senior Partners had something to do with transporting her to the previous timeline, but will the ramifications of this story play out somewhere down the line such as your upcoming Spike series.

Brian Lynch: Where the story went isn't up to me. Sorry.

27. bovy: Is Urru going to be the only artist on ALL-STAR SPIKE? Just curious, since that makes it hard to make it a monthly book. On the other hand, too many comics strive to make a monthly deadline, just because a lot of fans are used to it. Better to have 8 astonishing issues a year, than 12 average ones.


Just for the record, I realise that Urru is no slow artist. It's just that it takes more time when he prefers to ink his own pencils. During the timespan of AtF (18 months?)he produced 12 issues (8 Angel + 4 Spike). You'd have to be John Byrne or David Messina to beat that speed.

Brian Lynch:
I think, if we have someone come in and do an issue or two or three, it won't be in the middle of a storyline. Does that make sense?


28. Wyndam: Any chance that Mooney might do some alternate covers for Spike? It's almost depressing thinking that Last Angel In Hell might be his last Angelverse stint for a while.

Brian Lynch: I really super hope so.


29. Paul: Regardless of your feelings for Aftermath overall, how do you feel about the characters of Dez and James, both as a fan and a writer? Personally, I think they have potential, and would rather see them developed than thrown away.

Brian Lynch: I haven't read all of AFTERMATH yet (my bad, my work schedule is crazy right now), but I absolutely think you have to develop them. Even if people didn't like particular issues, they're a part of the series and can't just disappear.

30. [not so much a question, but...] angeliclestat: Ya I agree....if IDW just ignored the events of Aftermath just cos people didnt like it....there would be people complaining about that. So you cant win either way!

Brian Lynch: Exactly.

31. claytonm: Congratulations on a brilliant issue. It's been a while since we've seen angel and spike together and reading issue 26 was terrfific. You nailed Spike to perfection and I am so looking forward to the new Spike series.

Since you're leaving Angel and we wish you all the best, you'll be missed is Angel still the official continuation of the show since you and Joss Whedon are not really apart of it no more.

And what are your thoughts on Buffy season eight so far.

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MessageSujet: Re: Interviews sur les comics   Interviews sur les comics Icon_minitimeMer 17 Fév - 12:26

Interview sur le comics "A hole in the world" [Comicbookresources.com Interview] :

Citation :
When bringing a popular TV show to comics, nailing the tone, characters and continuity of the series is a must in selling the printed continuation to die hard fans. And making a straight adaptation of the series biggest stories brings an added layer of precision and pressure with it. Luckily for IDW’s currently running "Angel : A Hole In The World" mini series (which adapts a popular episode written and directed by show mastermind Joss Whedon), the writer at the helm of the adaptation has experience in this arena.

Scott Tipton helped bring both the classic puppet-themed episode "Smile Time" and the series finale "Not Fade Away" to comics last year. So when it came time to make the dramatic, tragic tale of "A Hole In The World" to comics, IDW called Tipton back to the job as well as artist Elena Casagrande. With the third issue of "Angel : A Hole In The World" hitting comic shops this month, CBR invited Tipton and Casagrande to pull back the curtain on their adaptation from the nuts and bolts of pacing a comic series to match a TV presentation to pulling off covers that evoke the best elements of the episode.

Scott Tipton : I’ve been lucky enough over the past year or so to have been chosen to adapt some of the most popular episodes of Joss Whedon’s series "Angel" to comic-book form. The first, "Smile Time," was a lot of fun – one of the more fun episodes of the series, “Smile Time” was a Muppets-style action romp, with lots of room for artists David Messina and Elena Casagrande and myself to have some fun with the story and even add a new scene or two. The second, "Not Fade Away," was a more by-the-numbers re-presentation of the series finale by myself and artist Stephen Mooney, in which we felt it best to play it strictly by the book, since the episode was much more serious in tone, and so beloved by the fans.

Our current project, however, "A Hole In The World," brought with it a whole new set of challenges. Artist Elena Casagrande and myself were tasked with adapting what’s considered the most tragic and emotionally wrenching storyline in the entire series, the slow and agonizing death of Team Angel member Fred, and her rebirth of sorts as the ancient goddess Illyria. It’s Joss Whedon at his best, and horrifyingly compelling television, but it’s not exactly action-packed, and depends more on tragedy and pathos than punches and kicks to tell its story. I had to admit, I was a little concerned. Elena, however, had a somewhat different reaction :

Elena Casagrande : For me, it was "Woo-Hoo ! I’ll be back on ’Angel’ and doing one of my favorite episodes !" I was very enthusiastic. I was looking forward to drawing Illyria, her ancient power and the wonderful detachment in her icy eyes. But I was also interested in capturing the love between Fred and Wes, and then their pain and their sadness.

The birth of Illyria, as seen in "A Hole In The World" #3, moving from pencils to inks.

The same page, now fully inked.

And the same page once more, now with colors by Ilaria Traversi.

I was worried about capturing the likenesses of all the actors ; I wanted it to feel like it was really them. I think that by the final issue, I’m on the right track ! I was concerned also about my ability to achieve the same feelings of the episode ; I know it’s impossible, but I think that in its differences from the televised episode, the comic adaptation conveys its feelings to the reader, and if I could achieve this, I’m happy.

Wesley and Illyria in happier, action-packed times, in this penciled page from issue #1.

Scott : So where do we even start ? First off for both of us was watching the episodes in question, “A Hole in the World” and “Shells,” and then watching them again. And then watching them again. I’d only seen the episodes once, upon their original broadcast, and they certainly didn’t disappoint ; not only were they some of the best work of the series, they were also brutally sad in places, while surprisingly funny in others – par for the course for a Whedon series, when you think about it.

Casagrande : Before, I had watched them two times, once in Italian and once in the original English. To prepare for the project, I watched them about three times, but often I re-watched the individual scenes every time I needed to consult one of them.

Scott : From there, we had to figure out just how to break up the two episodes over the course of five issues. This required one more viewing of the episodes, this time with pen and paper in hand, taking down every individual scene over the course of the two shows, to give us a list of every sequence we’d need to include in our allotted 110 pages. (And unlike "Smile Time," there was no thought of adding new scenes to his adaptation : not only did it just seem like heresy in a story this serious, but these episodes are so dense, there just wasn’t the room for it.)

Casagrande : I would have liked to, but it was very hard to think of what was really worth including.

Scott : With our master scene list in hand, we then went over the sequences in question and gave each a tag, SHORT, MEDIUM or LONG, indicating how much time we felt we needed to give each scene, not just in terms of action, but for emotional intensity. Since so much of this story is the slow deterioration of the Fred character and Wesley’s helplessness as he’s forced to watch the love of his life die, we knew we had to make sure that those moments got just as much emphasis as the flashier action scenes.

Once we had a rough idea of how the pacing would go, we tried to find four satisfying chapter breaks so as to split the story into five issues, and as luck would have it, things fell right into place ; so much so that we were able to take the unusual step of plotting out the entire miniseries, page by page, all at once right from the start.

Casagrande : It’s unusual for me to be so involved in the plotting of the series from the very beginning. It was very satisfying and interesting. I really enjoy working as a team : I can better understand the intent of the writer and the writer can understand my work. It’s really beautiful to work so very close, and it also makes the process itself much easier.

Scott : With the entire series now plotted out, we decided to get a little ambitious with the covers. Elena suggested doing a mosaic cover, connecting all five issues thematically with the opening maw from Illyria’s sarcophagus, symbolizing the moment when Fred was lost.

Casagrande : I wanted something to give to the readers that would "push" them to buy issue after issue, but also something that links the whole story of the two episodes.

Scott : After we hashed out what the five covers should be, Elena did a rough concept sketch :

That was followed up by a more detailed layout, which went to IDW Bossman Chris Ryall for approval.

Casagrande : The cover concepts are arranged by a specific design. In the first cover, Wes and Fred are together and happy, and in the last they are enemies. In the second cover there’s destruction, and in the fourth, creation. And the "nitty-gritty" of everything, the cause of it all was in the center, in Illyria’s circle. There’s also a color-link between them ; if you notice, the color palette changes from the red to the blue, as if to recreate the life and the death...and the passage from Fred to Illyria.

Tipton : Chris loved the idea, but was concerned that the cover concept for issue #3 might not be visually strong enough.

We then came up with two alternative covers, with Chris opting for the second one :

Here’s the final result, which Angel fans will be able to assemble for themselves once all five issues have been released.

With Elena working on the covers, I began work on the script for issue #1. Working from a copy of the teleplay, I began converting the rather sparsely detailed screenplay into a full comics script. Although I had seen the episodes recently at that point, I elected not to review them again while scripting, preferring to let the action in the screenplay dictate how the “camera” angles and panel-to-panel pacing play out. While I always write full-script, describing the page layouts for each page and all the action and perspectives for each panel, I’m also lucky enough to be working with extremely talented collaborators, and always tell them to feel free to do things differently if it makes the page stronger.

Casagrande : I always follow what the writer wrote and then I try to give it what it needs to be as readable as possible. I consult the video before every scene, especially to help me recreate the background. There are a lot of settings that you seem to know, but when you have to draw them in different situations (like for the laboratory scenes in issue #3) you have to recreate them in 3D in your mind. I like to be as close to the original as possible.

I think the toughest to achieve were the sequences of Angel and Spike in England. The scene is really dark on the screen, but I had also to make it understandable on the page.

Spike and Angel face off against an army of demons, in this penciled page from issue #2.

The same scene, in the process of being inked.

The final page, with colors by Ilaria Traversi.

Tipton : One of the real challenges in doing these Whedon episode adaptations, quite frankly, is making sure to retain all the dialogue. Whedon’s dialogue is such an integral part of what makes the show so popular, I’m loathe to cut any of it for space. I’m always afraid the line I might cut is some reader’s favorite. As a result, we were working extra hard to make sure the dialogue flowed naturally with the panel-to-panel storytelling, with Elena even providing marked-up guides for when we would turn the issues in to be lettered.

Casagrande : Whenever I had made some changes on the script, I’d try to provide the guides in order to ease the work for the letterer. The dialogue is so important in these episodes, we want to make sure the timing is just right !

Elena’s lettering guide for a page from issue #3.

Tipton : In this age of online streaming video and DVD season sets, with more availability for classic TV than ever before, some people have questioned the need for these kind of direct episode adaptations.

Casagrande : I think that if you’re an Angel fan, the comic version is another fun and exciting way to experience the series, and for those who never saw the show, well, it’s a really good story !

Tipton : For me, it’s no different than adapting a film to the Broadway stage, or translating a novel to the movies : the very nature of reconceptualizing the material is a transformative one. The mind takes in the material as comics in a different way than it does as a motion picture, and if we’ve done our jobs right and worked hard enough, everything we love and admire about the material will show up on the page as well.

If you ask us, that’s the only thing that makes it worth doing.

The third issue of "A Hole In The World" goes on sale in February. Issues 1 and 2 are still available at comic shops nationwide.


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MessageSujet: Re: Interviews sur les comics   Interviews sur les comics Icon_minitimeSam 18 Déc - 11:10

Interview sur les comics Illyria : http://www.comicbookresources.com/?page=article&id=29942


Citation :
As IDW Publishing's popular line of "Angel" comics begins to draw near its conclusion, one of the most popular supporting characters is receiving a long overdue moment in the spotlight with the miniseries "IIllyria: Haunted," written by Scott Tipton and Mariah Huehner and drawn by Elena Casagrande.

CBR News is pleased to present series co-writer Scott Tipton as he interviews Casagrande about their work on "Illyria," which sees its second issue hit stores on December 22 – and is also happy to offer an exclusive 5-page preview from "Illyria" #2!

Although she’s done her share of superhero work at Marvel and elsewhere, Casagrande has in recent years been specializing in books based on media licenses from television and film. In this exclusive interview, she explains what goes into capturing a likeness, the trick to making an emotionally empty character “act,” and which "Angel" character she considers “the one that got away.”


Scott Tipton: Over the course of your career, you've done a lot of work on licensed properties, from your solo debut on "The Ghost Whisperer" to our work on "Star Trek," and our current work on "Illyria" and "Angel." With so much of the success of the work depending on capturing the likenesses of the actors, how do you approach "designing" a known character for comics? Do you rely heavily on source material, or do you try and create a caricature that captures the actor's "essence?"

Elena Casagrande: I think that the likenesses of the actors in a licensed comic book are really important: the main reason why a fan wants to buy that comic is to find again his or her favorite characters and "hear again their voices" (if the writer is good!); moreover, I have to respect the image of the actor because it's the base of the character, the first step to recognizing the product and the first step to attracting the fans, old and new ones. I have many pictures of every character, and if I'm not satisfied with them, I look for the actor in another episode or movie and then I try to imagine the expression that I need in the comic, as natural as possible for that character. I mean, some facial expressions are an exclusive of an actor, so I try to be as close to him or her as I possibly can.

What do you find more difficult, keeping a consistent likeness during action sequences, or trying to convey emotion in more dramatic scenes, where you really have to make these recognizable characters "act?"

During a talking scene in a comic, it's easier to reproduce the likenesses because in the TV shows they are the most recurrent scene, so it's easy to imagine how every character should act. In an action sequence it's harder: in the TV series everything happens so fast that we can't focus so much on the expressions, so I try to imagine how every actor could have an angry, or surprised or scared face. Also, in the dramatic scenes I emphasize the emotions, bringing out some signs on the faces to be more than what we would see on TV; I have to exaggerate this emphasis of the characters because their image is the only way I have to communicate the emotions in their words, having only a silent picture of them instead of a moving sequence, sounds and music.

Starting with our work on "A Hole in the World," then moving on to the monthly "Angel" series, and now our "Illyria" miniseries, "Haunted," you've been drawing Illyria steadily for almost a year and a half now. With a character like Illyria, it must be even more difficult than most since the character is emotionally stunted, so you can't even be really exaggerated in her expressions. What's your experience been like in working with the Illyria character?

Honestly? Very easy! [Laughter] She's so stunted that I haven't to worry so much about her expression, since she'd be the same in most part of her sequences! But in some moments also I will give her some body signal to communicate, like the skewed head of a very serious expression, quite dangerous. There were some moments, especially in the "Angel" ongoing comic series and in the current series "Haunted," where I had to underline some scenes, so I humanized Illyria more than I normally would: it was strange for me to see her in that way, but necessary and in the end a nice result.

It seems to me like often your focus on the Illyria likeness is on the eyes. Is that where you start, in terms of capturing the emotion?

Sure! Her eyes are the first part through which we can see her like she is: empty. So they're big, open and staring and – and this is important – the pupil is bigger than a human one.

Normally, you do complete pencils and inks yourself. But in the current issue, you worked with artist Walter Trono, who provided pencils based on your layouts, which you then inked. How closely do you oversee the penciller's work in a situation like this? Is he working from your specific direction, or does he have some room to interpret the script himself?

I gave him some very rough layouts from which he could work, during the first part of the issue where there are more talking scenes; during the action sequences I gave him the freedom to realize them and he did great work. I focused only on the likeness and some more stylistic features.

One of the things we got to do in "Illyria" #2 was indulge in a bit of outright comedy, something that's occasionally in short supply in the dark, moody "Angel" books. Is this something you were looking forward to?

Oh yes, absolutely, I love those moments in "Angel"...they make more dramatic the rest of the story!

Another fun aspect of this second issue was being able to guest-star Spike in such a significant role. I get to deal with the Spike/Illyria relationship through dialogue, which seems like the much easier job. How do you approach expressing that relationship between the two of them through the visuals?

I worked especially on Spike; he's so expressive that he works for both of them. Illyria has her stillness, a rigidity about her, her emptiness, her awkwardness, and the best way to show them is to show Spike's reactions to them; they, on this level, are opposite characters but are living a similar situation, so we can see two different reactions to the same unease: to be excluded from the world.

"Angel" had a very large cast of regular and supporting players over the course of its five seasons, and by this point you've had the opportunity to tackle almost all of them. Are there any that you dread having to draw, whether because they feel difficult, or just because getting them right takes a lot of work? Conversely, which characters do you love seeing in a script? If it was your dream "Angel"book, who would be in every issue?

I'm a fan of Angel but I have to admit: the hardest character to draw right is Angel. The actor has a likeness that’s very hard to reproduce, so often I would wind up drawing someone who is reminiscent of Angel, but he wasn't David Boreanaz...and I wasn't happy. Often I will re-draw him different times, until I'm satisfied and I think, "It's him!"

The challenge about my favorite likeness is won by Spike: Angel fans, don't hate me, but it's true: James Marsters has a face more distinctive than all the other characters. With the hair, the eyebrows, the nose, the cheekbones and the chin...it's easier for me! Anyway, it will be hard for me to leave all of them!

And I would have loved so much to draw Cordelia...sigh!


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MessageSujet: Re: Interviews sur les comics   Interviews sur les comics Icon_minitimeJeu 20 Jan - 13:49


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MessageSujet: Re: Interviews sur les comics   Interviews sur les comics Icon_minitimeJeu 27 Jan - 14:00

Une interview sur les comics Illyria : http://buffyfest.blogspot.com/2011/01/illyria-3-micro-interview-with-mariah.html

Citation :
Illyria #3 Micro Interview with Mariah Huehner

Buffyfest: We get to see lots of new and unique creatures and demons in this issue. What was the inspiration for them?

Mariah Huehner:
I think the first thing we wanted was to open up the world a bit. When you revisit something like The Deeper Well you can't just rehash what's come before. Even though it's a place with a very painful history, it had to offer something new or it would look like a cop-out. So it was really important that we give it a new dimension, a new atmosphere in certain ways, which included new creatures.

Characters like the Cephaladogs (that's what I call them, anyway) were mostly inspired by my ridiculous love of octopi and squid, Henson creatures from shows like Farscape, and a whole bunch of deep sea doc's I'd been watching. I figured making creatures that would be connected to Illyria and allow her new dimensions was a fun way to blend my absurd admiration for squidly octopi and a very necessary character arc. Plus, since Illyria's Old One form had tentacles, it made for a nice call back and a way to make them distantly "related".

Buffyfest: The new Keeper of the Deeper Well is not what Illyria (or the audience) might expect. Would you tell us a little bit about her, who she is and where the idea for her came from?

MH:
She's kind of a blend of Maleficent from Sleeping Beauty (one of my all-time favorite characters), my grandmothers, and Miss Marple (the knitting, spectacles, and tea are all a nod to her). I wanted to have the new Keeper be something completely and entirely different than The Drogyn, with a unique attitude and style. Physically, I wanted her to be the polar opposite of Sally from issue #2 and be exactly the sort of creature Illyria would underestimate along with the audience. We never tell you what she is, or even who she is (she's never named). She's mysterious on purpose, to keep you wondering. Especially about how it is she knows the things she does. What was really incredible, though, was how perfectly Elena drew her. It was like she read my mind, although obviously I did describe her in the script. But I'd done a sketch of her myself that I never showed Elena, of the characters face, and it's a dead ringer. Getting those pages in was a delight.

The other thing I wanted to avoid was being obvious with the new Keeper. Which would have been to make it some kind of warrior Illyria had to fight. I think that's really easy with Illyria and gets in the way of her development sometimes. As much fun as it is to see her break things, I'd rather she do it with some kind of purpose. And since this series is about her needing to address her place in the world, it seemed important to me that she interact with different personalities without always punching things. Between Sally and the new Keeper we get two very distinct female characters, too. And they both help Illyria in their own ways.


Buffyfest: Let's talk feminist subtext. The only speaking characters in this issue are two women (for lack of a better term). Was that intentional?

MH:
Yes, it definitely was. I wanted to have an issue that would pass The Bechdel test, where there are two main female characters who talk about something besides men. Usually that's in film, but I thought it would make for a good challenge here. We've very rarely seen Illyria in a context that doesn't involve one of the male characters, and usually her story revolves around them in some way. Which makes sense in the main series since everyone revolves around Angel to some degree, but, I wanted this to really be -her- story. And while I know she's this kind of amorphous, not really gendered character, she appears in a female body to the world. So some of how she's perceived has to do with the shell she's in, and it influences how other characters treat her. Which then influences how she views them.

This feeling of otherness is one of the main themes I wanted to explore in the series, from a feminist perspective. Feeling out of place in the world, alien in your own body, somehow inherently wrong. Illyria commented in the series about feeling like the wrong size, for instance, and being cut off from the world she understood. Those always felt like metaphors to me, while also being literally true for the character. Obviously not just women feel that way, but it's one of the ways I identify with the character and one of the core issues she's been dealing with since the beginning. So it felt right to make it a major element of her arc.


Buffyfest: Illyria speaks in another language here. Was this language derived from anything that already exists?

MH:
Yes! The big influence is Elvish, although phonetically, I didn't attempt to spell anything like Tolkien did. I love the lyric quality of that language so I based a number of words loosely on how certain Elvish ones sound. There are also a lot of anagrams, such as Tirmek! That's Kermit with the letters rearranged. Because he's my favorite muppet and I love him dearly.

Buffyfest: There's a huge shift in Illyria's character that's expressed mostly in half thoughts and Elena's art, would you elaborate on what's happening to Illyria during this sequence?

MH:
It's really two things. 1. A profound realization of who she's been, who she could be, and who she actually is. What it cost, why it matters, and what's to come. It's a moment of sort of excruciating insight, of bringing everything together that she's been feeling, dreaming, and questioning. 2. A reclamation, but you won't know of precisely what until #4.

When she reaches out to touch the stone she's mirroring what Fred did in A Hole in the World (which has been a theme throughout) and the curiosity that partly led to her death. I wanted to show Illyria having some of that same curiosity, being drawn to something beyond herself, and experiencing an emotional shift and a certain kind of "ending". It's deliberately abstract and vaguely poetic, since I don't think you can describe something like that in any kind of linear, clear way. Illyria is a bit of a self-important character, which makes her perfect for expressing your own existential dread. Not to mention the subtle physical alterations that indicate the inner changes visually.

What I hope the scene accomplishes is the idea that Illyria's awareness has shifted, or is at least starting to. She sees herself and the world in a different way, which culminates in issue #4. And it's these moments combined that shape her arc.

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MessageSujet: Re: Interviews sur les comics   Interviews sur les comics Icon_minitimeMer 16 Mar - 1:50

Les comics ATS chez IDW touchent à leur fin ! Une interview des personnes qui ont travaillé sur ces comics, pour conclure l'aventure :



Citation :
Saying Goodbye To IDW's "Angel"

by Kiel Phegley


Interviews sur les comics Thumbn10


Six years ago, IDW Publishing picked up the rights to a TV series. And while the publisher had worked on licensed comics before and continues to today, their nabbing of the "Angel" franchise created by Joss Whedon stands as perhaps the strongest example of what comic book follow ups can give back to the characters and the fans of long gone television serials.


From its first stories chronically life within the world of the titular vampire's battle with the law firm of Wolfram And Hart through multiple spinoffs featuring characters like Wesley and (of course) Spike and on to the Whedon-co-written "After The Fall" canonical follow up to the show's last season, IDW covered a large amount of material and expanded Angel's world in ways unexpected ways. And this April, it will all come to an end.


As Angel and company prepare to return to their initial home of "Buffy The Vampire Slayer" which is currently published by Dark Horse, the creators who've shepherded the franchise forward at IDW are preparing to say goodbye. Aside from the upcoming final issues of the "Angel" ongoing and "Spike" – the ongoing series brought short to eight issues – IDW will also release a giant-sized "Angel Yearbook" in April featuring special farewell tales from a variety of creators associated with the franchise. To celebrate the end, CBR News spoke with four of the writers behind the one-shot – original "Angel scribe Jeff Mariotte, "After The Fall" and "Spike" writer Brian Lynch, current "Angel" writer David Tischman and prolific franchise contributor Scott Tipton – for their take on where they've been, what final stories they had to tell, what impact their work will have on the characters and they grow back towards Buffy and more.


CBR News: You guys have collectively had as big an impact on the direction of the Angel comics at IDW as anybody involved. What's the journey been like, and what's it like for you to see this run wrap up?

Jeff Mariotte: The Angel license came to IDW because I had an existing relationship with the Fox licensing person in charge of the property, thanks to the many Angel (and Buffy) novels I had written. By the time the deal was done and they were ready to start putting out books, I had left the company to go freelance, but I was pleased to be asked to write the first couple of story arcs. Those were tricky, because Joss hadn't quite decided whether he was going to try to keep the story going through direct-to-DVD movies or some other way, so I was given a pretty complicated instruction – write stories that seem like they take place after the series finale, but might also take place before it. Having written eleven Angel novels, a nonfiction book, and then eleven Angel comic book stories (two five-issue minis, and the "Doyle" one-shot), I thought it was a good time to retire from Angel writing. They lured me back for one last tale when I got the chance to write the first puppet Angel comic book story, but then I was done.

Brian Lynch: It’s emotional, for sure. The series I’m writing now, "Spike," was originally an unlimited series, and we were really plowing into the outline/blueprint for the first year. Tiny moments in the first couple of issues would have blossomed into big moments down the line. I had just finished scripting issue #1 of the series when I got the call from Chris Ryall that "Angel" and "Spike" would be leaving IDW. Of course I understood Joss’ desire to have all his characters under one roof, I’d want the exact same thing. I just wish it was the roof that I was also living under. It’s a nice roof with wonderful landlords.

Anyway, I tossed out that story and started anew. Plus side was, we got to go out big: it was really cool of Joss to let us borrow Willow for our story, and equally awesome of Scott Allie to give us the inside scoop on the bug ship and Spike’s role in "Buffy," so we could set it up in our SPIKE series and have the two series tie in. Unrelated note, I think now might be a good time to plug my NEW completely unrelated comic "Pike," starring a smart-ass Scottish vampire in San Diego.

Scott Tipton: I’m not going to lie; it’s very emotional. In a lot of ways I’m still in denial about it. Although I had written a few smaller things in comics before it, and have done lots of other things since, my first high-profile writing job in comics was my first "Spike" graphic novel, "Old Wounds." And although I’m probably a lot more well-known as a Star Trek writer nowadays, I’ve been involved in the Angel franchise for the entire time IDW has had the license. I think we took very good care of Joss’s baby, and I hate to see it go.

David Tischman: I really like Angel, the character. I love a hero motivated by redemption, a hero who overcomes his own personal failings every day. It's super-heroes, really. All the vampire stuff out there, it's just super-heroes. Instead of running super fast, or wearing a magic ring, these characters need to drink blood to live. It's how they deal with that. So, long story short, I'm sad to see Angel go. Mariah Huehner, who edited me when I wrote the "Angel: Barbary Coast" mini-series last year, and who's been my co-writer on the monthly "Angel" book, we had some big, long-term plans for Angel.


Before we get into the "Yearbook" finale, David, you were already heading towards a "season finale" of sorts before the news of Angel's end at IDW hit. Once you knew that this arc would be the last of the series, did it change much of what you were building?

Tischman:
The current storyline, with Angel in the future, was originally envisioned as a 12-issue, year-long maxi-story. And it was all about Angel, really focusing on him in the future. Back to the super-hero idea. He was going to become a hero in the future, kind of like their Batman. Sorry. No pun intended. Really. But when we realized the license was going away, we made adjustments to that story; in the end, we told the story we wanted to tell, we got to deal with the character of Angel in the way we wanted, in these last six issues.

And you've introduced Rowant in issue #42 – the long-awaited big bad of this arc. What can you tell us about her origins and what you wanted that character to accomplish in terms of Wolfram & Hart? What other threads are you looking to tackle by the end of #44?

Tischman:
I love Rowant. She's my kind of girl. I think two of the best things Bill Willinghmam did on his run was creating Rowant and Laura. She also brings the idea of a really powerful female villain back to the book. With Wolfram & HArt, we wanted to create a world in which the firm had lost all its power, where it was a minor player, who needed Angel's help. Time's a funny thing. Things that were so important 100 years ago are forgotten today. And minor events get bent through the course of history. Angel is – I always forget the exact number – like 200 years old, and he's seen this, first-hand. For Rowant, aeons-old and immortal, it affects the way she sees what's happening today.

Meanwhile, Brian, your last full IDW comic in the world of these characters is for the "Spike" series. That character has had such a strong thread in your hands, and you've introduced a lot of concepts that stuck with him. How did you and Franco approach the final issues of Spike in terms of bringing the Vegas setting and cast members like Betta George and even Dru to a close?

Lynch:
Well, we knew how the series was going to end because of our discussions with Scott Allie. We talked about how it had to feature the story of Spike becoming captain of a space ship with an all-insect crew. So the skeleton of that last tale was easy.

The real fun came with Spike reacting to what is, as many readers have pointed out, the very odd (even for the Buffyverse) situation of an interdimensional bug space craft. Spike’s seen some weird, weird stuff in his life, but I think this is probably the strangest. Naturally his immediate reaction is going to be a memorable one.

The emotion came from wrapping up Spike’s plotlines with the characters Franco and I created for the IDW Spike series. Firestarter Beck, telepathic fish Betta George, Spike’s human buddy Jeremy...we never saw them on the ship with Spike over in the "Buffy" book, so they had to say good-bye to our hero. For now. If they survive. This is the Whedonverse, after all.

And Willow is showing up at the end. What's been your favorite part of getting her on the page and with Spike?

Lynch: Willow is an amazing character and this was my first time writing dialog for her, so that was a real honor. One of my favorite scenes on the "Buffy" TV show was when Spike tried to bite Willow in her dorm, but couldn’t because of the chip in his head. As the scene went on, she went from being scared for her life to feeling bad for him. Their chemistry was amazing. I tried to recapture that in the "Spike" comic.

And while I was writing the Spike/Willow scenes, I was also reading the "Buffy" comic, which was going to some incredibly dark places. Giles getting his neck snapped by Angel, that kind of thing. It was brilliantly done, but WOW was it heartbreaking. I wrote the Spike/Willow reunion issues as an antidote to that. The situation that Willow comes into in "Spike" isn’t nearly as dire as what went on in the "Buffy" books, so I was able to have a little more fun.

Of course, a lot of people are curious as to how your story is going to thread together with what we've seen of Spike in "Buffy Season 9." Do the parts you're working in take a front seat in the end of your original story, or are you coming at the big ship from a different angle?

Lynch:
You’ll start seeing the set-up for just how Spike came across the bug ship in issue #6. By the end of the "Spike" series, it’s quite clear who the bugs are, why they follow Spike, and who Spike was pursuing when he started getting pulled into the Twilight escapade.


I LOVED writing all the bug ship stuff. I wish it could have come sooner. Let’s do a spin-off, "Cap’N Spike And The SS Grasshopper." Come on, it’ll be fun. For all I know, Dark Horse is doing that. Probably not the same title, though.

Like I said, the "Yearbook" issue is promising to be the big she-bang for Angel at IDW. When you heard that the book was being put together, what was the story you immediately wanted to tell?

Lynch: I wanted to include the entire gang: Angel, Spike, Illyria, Gunn and Connor spearhead the adventure. It deals with some key moments in their lives, their greatest victories and their biggest regrets.

The plot is Angel’s Uncle is going to lose his surf shop unless they can win the big surf contest. Problem is, it’s during the day. What’s a sun-allergic vampire to do? SPOILERS, he wears a wetsuit. Also, Spike does the hula. Crap, I just ruined the whole thing. It’s actually about paths not taken. And fighting. And Wesley kinda sorta makes an appearance.

Tipton: More than anything else, I just wanted the chance to say goodbye to a couple of favorite characters, and by extension, to a series that’s been such a big part of my life for the last six years.

Tischman: I've been incredibly fortunate at IDW to tell the Angel stories I want to tell. I'm leaving feeling good, and I hope the fans liked what we did. Actually, there is one other story I wanted to tell. It would take place a little before "Barbary Coast." I'm a big fan of the movie "Jeremiah Johnson," and the story is a one-off, 22 pages of Angel as a fur trapper in the mountains. Completely alone in the wild. The story is silent--no dialogue or VO, just the sounds of animals and nature.

Mariotte: For this one, I was given quite a bit of latitude. Pick a character, and deliver a sort of farewell story for him or her--that was essentially the charge. The overall theme, I was told, was redemption. I couldn't resist that. I chose Gunn, who struck me from the first moment we saw him on-screen, back in the season one episode "War Zone," as an incredibly exciting, versatile, and entertaining character, with a tragic history and an unlimited future. I wanted to dig into his roots, his early days, before he met Angel and the gang, and unearth a little about what makes him tick.

What can you tell me about how the final story you did turned out? What piece of the Angel world do you feel it has the most to say about? What artist did you work with?

Lynch:
My story that celebrates the characters. "Angel" is my favorite TV show of all time, and if this was my last story, so I wanted to spotlight what I love about each character. Hopefully that comes through when you read it. Franco Urru is doing my last story, though I haven’t seen any art for it yet. I HAVE seen his art for the last issue of "Spike," and it is stunning.

Tipton: When "Angel" editor Mariah Huehner came to artist Elena Casagrande and me about the "Yearbook," there wasn’t much deliberation at all: we knew we wanted to tell a Wesley and Fred story. Elena and I have spent the last two years absorbed in Wesley and Fred’s tragic romance, first in our adaptation miniseries "A Hole In The World," and then exploring its repercussions in "Illyria: Haunted." So when we heard we had one last opportunity to tell an Angel story, we really wanted to give Wesley and Fred something we never had been able to before: a few happy moments. Elena and I wrote it together; it takes place just before the events of "A Hole In The World." If we have to exit the stage of Angel’s world, I’m happy that this is the one we’re going out on.

Tischman: Again, I've been lucky. I worked with Franco Urru on "Barbary Coast," and Elena Casagrande on the monthly book. Both really talented artists. It's been a pleasure working with them. Sometimes you can get stuck with an artist who doesn't understand the mood of the world you're creating. Both Franco and Elena showed their love for the character, and their understanding of who Angel is, on every page. I hope they enjoyed the scripts as much as I enjoyed the art.

Mariotte: I haven't seen the art yet. I've been told that it's by David Messina, with whom I worked on most of the earlier Angel stuff, so I can't wait to check it out. Since it takes place before Gunn meets Angel, it's a look at a changing Los Angeles – a place in which vampires are coming out of the shadows and turning into yet another plague striking at the disadvantaged. What we never really saw on the show was how Gunn and his friends became vampire hunters. I hope this story gives a glimpse into that process.

Brian, whether you play with the elements from "After The Fall" in your story or not, that series was such a huge deal for the character and the franchise as well. What do you think the character and the world of Buffy will carry with them because of the book that they didn't have before?

Lynch: Man, no idea what my legacy will be. I just hope people enjoy the books, whether they read them now or years from now. I’d like to think Joss will wake up in a cold sweat one night and scream “I have a great idea for Betta George!” At which point his wife will look at him oddly and he’ll jut out his lower lip and say “you just don’t get me.” They’ll bicker, and then he’ll have to sleep on the couch that night. But it will be on a couch made ENTIRELY of "Avengers" money.

Between all the Spike and Angel issues you've done and really all the material IDW has put out, what favorite moments come to mind?

Lynch: So many moments come to mind. I loved sitting down with Joss Whedon to hear all the plans for "Angel: After The Fall." That was one of favorite moments in life, let alone favorite moments working on the series. Also, doing "Spike: Shadow Puppets" was the most fun. Spike goes to Japan to stop the Japanese "Smile Time" spin-off. Ninja Puppets, Puppet Spike, with killer art by Franco Urru.

There’s also "Last Angel In Hell," which was a comic adaptation of a film written by a character that Angel saved when Los Angeles went to hell. The fact that Chris Ryall and the rest of the gang at IDW let myself and artist Stephen Mooney do a book that was “the official adaptation” of a movie that didn’t exist, that was pretty cool.

And I just want to say, I think IDW is going out strong in terms of "Angel" books. "Angel’s" last story arc, written by Mariah Huehner and David Tischman is my favorite since the series began. And there is an awesome "Illyria" mini-series by Mariah Huehner, Scott Tipton and Elena Casagrande is quite amazing. So while I’m sad IDW is losing the "Angel" franchise, at least we go out on the top of our game.

Tipton: Overall, I have to say that the high point has to be Brian Lynch and Franco Urru’s absolutely masterful work on "After The Fall," the official follow-up to the series finale. I thought they did an absolutely amazing job of picking up the ball from Joss and running with it, and I think it’s still the watermark that every "Angel" story since has tried to measure up to.

As for my own work, I’m too close to it to judge. I thought artist David Messina and I created a pretty cool Big Bad with Lilitu, our demon goddess from our series "Auld Lang Syne" – we always wanted to bring her back. I did a neat little trick in a Wesley story for "Angel: Spotlight" where the ending reads entirely different depending on if the reader has seen Season 5 or not; I’m still kinda proud of that. The finished graphic novel of "A Hole In The World" is maybe my favorite book of mine, just because we labored over that thing for so long. And the "Illyria" series that’s just finishing up is unlike anything I’ve ever done, no doubt thanks to my co-writer Mariah’s influence, and I think it’s the best work of Elena’s career.

But by far, the most rewarding thing about the experience has been the friends I’ve made working on it. David Messina, Elena Casagrande, Franco Urru, Stephen Mooney, Brian Lynch – all amazing talents I was lucky to be able to collaborate with and with whom I’m already planning to do so again in the future, or else certainly hoping to. Sure, the books on the shelf are nice, but those relationships are a hell of a lot more valuable, and certainly mean more. And for that I owe "Angel" (and more to the point, IDW chief Chris Ryall, who gave me a chance to pitch a Spike story to FOX back in May of 2005) a debt I can never really repay.

Tischman: "After The Fall." Angel in that story, and what he accomplishes, and why. And the characterizations of all the players, and how they interact – just super terrific work. And the "Illyria" mini Mariah did with Scott Tipton. In that case, it was writers who love the character taking her to another level – using the foundation created on the show and in previous issues to create something new, and yet 100% authentic.

Mariotte: I'm gonna have to go with puppet Angel. That episode was so great, and getting the chance to write the first non-televised puppet Angel story was a dream and an honor.

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Date d'inscription : 07/01/2009

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